How to Become Compliant with the New US Rooftop Safety Standards

Within the past year and a half, there have been several new rooftop safety standards added. To make it easier to become compliant, we have listed the top 5 that you should be taking immediate action to remedy.

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10 Common Rooftop Safety Hazards

When working on rooftops, safety should be everyone’s number one priority. There are, unfortunately, many different hazards that can be present on a rooftop. This article goes into the top 10 common hazards you should keep in mind before stepping foot onto a rooftop.

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6 OHSA Changes Those Will Impact Ontario Employers

Amendments called the Stronger, Fairer Ontario Act, 2017 (Bill 177), have been made to the Ontario Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA) and went into effect on December 14, 2017.

Amendments called the Stronger, Fairer Ontario Act, 2017 (Bill 177), have been made to the Ontario Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA) and went into effect on December 14, 2017. These amendments are the largest changes that have been implemented into OHSA in over 15 years. Some of the changes include tripling corporate OHSA penalties and quadrupling individual OHSA penalties.

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Seven Steps to Safer Behaviour

One of the most common denominators for organizational performance issues is behavior, especially when it comes to safety. It is because of this that we often see repeated poor safety performance with no sustainable change in behavior due to the fact that the focus is on the action and not the behavior that lead to the action.

 

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UPDATE: Working at Heights Deadline Extension

Update: The Ministry of Labour has extended the Working at Heights training compliance deadline to Oct. 1, 2017.

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March is Eye Injury Awareness Month

If your employees are exposed to hazardous chemicals, it is IMPERATIVE that you do everything you can to ensure that your emergency eye wash stations meet the required safety standards to protect workers. Chemical eye injuries are a painful and frightening experience that may leave a person BLINDED for life and should be AVOIDED at all costs.

Did you know that over 2,000 eye injuries occur on job sites daily and roughly 10% of them require missed days to recover? OR that of the total amount of work-related eye injuries, 10 to 20% will result in temporary or permanent vision loss in the affected employees? If your employees are exposed to hazardous chemicals, it is IMPERATIVE that you do everything you can to ensure that your emergency eye wash stations meet the required safety standards in order to protect your employees. Chemical eye injuries are a painful and frightening experience that may leave a person BLINDED for life and should be AVOIDED at all costs.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has two different types of regulations, general and specific, which apply to emergency eye wash station equipment which are designed in order to promote eye safety under certain work conditions. The first is a general requirement for eye wash stations. The second is determined based upon the industry which your business operates in. OSHA’s general regulation is applicable to all facilities that require the installation of eye wash station equipment as a form of first aid, it is contained in 29 CFR 1910.151. It states that:

 “…where the eyes or body of any person may be exposed to injurious corrosive materials, suitable facilities for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body shall be provided within the work area for immediate emergency use.”

This blog post will go over 10 tips to ensure that YOUR eye was stations meet the REQUIRED safety standards:

  1. Don’t block access. AVOID storing anything in front of or below an eye wash unit that could block an injured employees’s ability to stand comfortably or reach the station.
  2. Don’t hold the unit at an angle. If the unit is held on an angle it can INTERFERE with the correct flow of flushing fluid, which may result in an injured employee having to stand in an uncomfortable position to flush properly for up to 20 minutes.
  3. Keep the doors open. NEVER place an emergency eye wash station behind a closed or even worse locked door. Even though the station may not be used on a regular basis when it is needed your employees vision is on the line and every second matters.
  4. Fill the unit properly. According to ANSI, the unit MUST be filled with flushing fluid or pre-packed fluid provided by the manufacturer. Avoid errors when mixing flushing fluid by always following manufacturers instructions.
  5. Watch the unit’s temperature. It is imperative that the flushing fluid never become too hot or too cold. Flushing eyes with extremely hot or ice cold solution can cause further damage to an already injured eye. According to ANSI fluid temperature must be ‘TEPID’. Tepid is defined at between 60°F (16°C) and 100°F (38°C). However, in circumstances where a chemical reaction is accelerated by flushing fluid temperature, a facilities safety/health advisor should be consulted to determine the optimum water temperature for each application.
  6. Install the unit correctly. NEVER install an eyewash unit without carefully following the manufacturers instructions. Being that stations vary, each one will have specific installation instructions to ensure proper performance. For example, installation height, the rate of fluid flow, and required spray pattern to name a few.
  7. Don’t alter or tamper with the unit. It is imperative that manufacturers instructions are ALWAYS followed. Things such as re-routing hoses or changing nozzles will compromise the unit’s performance.
  8. Keep in mind the unit’s shelf life. ALWAYS avoid using expired flushing fluid. Like any standing water, eye wash fluid has the ability to grow bacteria that is harmful to eyes. Ensure that you have a designated person to check the unit’s expiration dates and to refill/replace fluid as needed. According to ANSI Z358.1-2009, weekly flushing is required for plumbed stations, every three to six months for tank-style fluid stations and every two to three years for sealed-fluid cartridges and bottles.
  9. Clean thoroughly after use. Any lingering cleaning chemicals or cleaning particles could HARM the next user’s eyes. When the wrong chemicals come into contact, the fluid may turn brown or another colour and coloured fluid is NEVER usable. Never forget to clean, disinfect and completely dry the unit after each activation, this includes nozzles, hoses and nozzle covers.
  10. Do not cover the unit. Covering the unit with a makeshift cover like a plastic bag to keep dust or particles out can hinder an injured employees’ ability to properly activate the unit in a single motion. Preventing them to start the flow in one second or less which, is required by ANSI/OSHA.

By understanding how to use emergency eye wash stations properly, your facility can ENSURE greater workplace eye safety. Eyes are one of the most vulnerable parts of the body and the benefits of understanding these tips are endless.

To learn more about eye wash requirements specific to your industry check out the link below:

http://www.gesafety.com/downloads/ANSIGuide.pdf

 

The Importance of Athletic Equipment Inspections.

One of the main focuses of schools, and more specifically a school’s athletic department should be focusing on helping students achieve their highest athletic aspirations. But in order to truly do this schools need to provide a safe environment, and more specifically safe equipment to practise with.

Related: PARCS LTD Inspection Process, Inspections and Gym Inspections  Continue reading “The Importance of Athletic Equipment Inspections.”